Applied Posture Riding - coreexercises,

  • Applied Core Stability E-Book

    10 copy 1

       This is a core training program for people who want to learn how to use their core for function and for a living.

    You will learn HOW TO use your core for work, for rest, and for play.

    I call this Functional Core Stability or Life Style Pilates.

    So many people attend Pilates classes and certainly many do strengthen their core.

    However, there seems to be a large group who fail to transfer the strength or use of their core into daily life.

    Pilates exercises are designed to be performed in "Neutral Spine". I think many people become confused and forget to use their core for their daily work and activities.

    I think many people become confused and forget to use their core for their daily work and activities.

     So I have covered many of the problems I encounter in my work as a Physiotherapist.

    The Program in this book covers numerous areas of strength training and in particular all of the following.

    • I have addressed this problem by showing you how to train your core in various non-neutral movement patterns.
    • As a Physiotherapist, I am able to teach you about the Anatomy and mechanics of the deep core muscles as well as the major postural muscles.
    •  The training is set up in chapters and you will work through a step by step process starting with learning about the body and how it works.
    • I have detailed chapter on the relationship between the core and your posture.
    • You will be taught my jargon because the language I use is unique to me and my training.
    • The key to all Pilates training is getting the core muscle to work. I spend a whole chapter on how to engage the deep core muscle. I call this the "Core Crunch" and this is the first movement pattern of many you will learn as you work through the book.
    • I call this the "Core Crunch" and this is the first movement pattern of many you will learn as you work through the book.
    • As a Physiotherapist, I treat people who start an exercise program at the wrong level and consequentially they get injured. I have put together a chapter to show you how to test your major muscles for strength. this will give you an understanding of how strong or weak you are.
    • In the next chapter, I will show you how to train your core using the big ball, that is training in positions that are not the neutral spine.
    •  Your posture and your core must be coordinated so I will teach you how to follow a few routines to strengthen and use good postures.
    •  Stretching is a major component of good body health. In this chapter, I provide you with a number of stretches you need to do to either regain flexibility or maintain range of movement on a regular basis.
    •  The use of your core is the key feature to a strong core. In this section, I show you how to use your core for function. I demonstrate ways you can use the "Core Crunch" to lift, to change postures, and to train your core to become more automatic rather than on-demand.
    •  As a Physiotherapist, I have knowledge of the things that affect your core, such as pain. In this chapter, I teach you about the daily challenges that directly affect your core and how to handle them.
    •  Many of you will want further training to gain more strength in your core. Advanced strength training requires a strong core to start with so once you have followed the chapters you are ready to learn some advanced exercises. Many of these are pure Pilates exercises and they will give greater core strength. 
    • Many people following this program may require a support brace to assist in their core and or postural training or for pain control. 
    • I prescribe a lumbar back brace for those of you with chronic or severe pain. If your pain in minimal and you just need some support then a mini back brace is perfect. I also find a large group of people just need a reminder to engage their core so a "Core Sensory Belt" is ideal.
    So if you need some help with the training of your core then this E-Book is an ideal tool for you to follow.
    for horse riders, I recommend the "Applied Posture Riding The Fundamentals of Riding"  E-Book. This book has a great deal more education and training specific to horse riders and I totally recommend this book to all horse riders.
    So if you want to train your core for strength and for function as well as train your posture and manage pain then this is the book for you.
    I am happy to answer any questions along the way.
    I love this topic.
    Annette Willson
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • Core Stability and How to Train The Transverse Abdominal Muscle

    Did You Know This Muscle is The Single Most Important Muscle to Have a strong For Skillful Riding?

     Core stability provides several benefits to the musculature system. A strong core will maintain lower back health and assist in preventing injury in numerous parts of the body. The training of the core is a mandatory part of treatment by physical therapists, athletic trainers, and musculoskeletal trainers. Core stability is the ability of the lumbar spine to remain stable while the body or limbs perform a function, eg throw a ball, hang out the washing. The photo shows the anatomy of the chief core muscles.

    The health of the joints and bones will have a huge influence on the function of the core. The pain will inhibit its contraction and it will switch off when the body suffers pain.  Core stability is predominantly maintained by the dynamic function of the Transverse Abdominal Muscle. Specific

    Core stability is the ability of the lumbar spine to remain stable while the body or limbs perform a function, eg throw a ball, hang out the washing. The photo shows the anatomy of the chief core muscles. The health of the joints and bones will have a huge influence on the function of the core. The pain will inhibit its contraction and it will switch off when the body suffers pain.  Core stability is predominantly maintained by the dynamic function of the Transverse Abdominal Muscle. Specific

    Core stability is predominantly maintained by the dynamic function of the Transverse Abdominal Muscle. Specific core exercises will achieve this. There is a clear relationship between trunk muscle activity and the stability and quality of movements. Core hold

      Current medical evidence suggests that decreased core stability may predispose to injury and that appropriate training may reduce injury.  

    The horse rider is at risk of injury from many areas of riding. Riding itself creates a compounding impact through the seat and lower back. This will cause microdamage and pain. The pain switches the core off and the rider is open to further injury and of course, their riding skills are lost.

    By training the core a horse rider can prevent this.

     The care of a horse loads the body, in particular, the lower back. This happens in many ways and often. The joints become worn and the pain creeps in and again the core is switched off. Preventing pain and maintaining the strongest core possible for riding is essential.

    My Applied Posture Riding Membership Program is a horse and rider program designed to teach horse riders, how to gain the best and effective horse riding posture. The specific horse riding exercises are simple, easy but most of all effective.  Join my Applied Posture Riding Facebook page.

    Good luck and enjoy your riding. Annette Willson.   

  • Lower Back Pain...How To Manage It As A Horse Rider

     

    4820068 spine I think lower back pain is the single most inhibiting factor for horse riders. It certainly seems to be the most common problem horses riders suffer. It also seems to be the problem not well managed by the medical profession as far as horse riders are concerned. Every horse rider who has emailed me has been told to quit riding and find another sport. 

      I was told the same at 18 years old to never ride a horse again. I recovered and went on to ride at an international level, I still manage my lower back pain and live life as I want, not by a doctor's standard.

    The most common causes of low back pain are:

    • Overuse of muscles, ligaments, and joints
    • Repetitive movements
    • lifting and twisting
    • jarring eg. machinery
    • osteoarthritis
    • the trauma of various kinds

    Leg pain (nerve pain) can be caused by pressure from the disc, swelling, inflammation of the joint.

    When osteoarthritis affects the small joints in the spine, it can lead to back pain. Osteoarthritis in other joints, such as the hips, can cause you to limp or to change the way you walk. This can also lead to back pain.

    Spondylolisthesis, a defect that allows one vertebra to slide over another. Spinal stenosis, or narrowing of the spinal canal, which is usually caused by getting older.Fractures of the vertebrae caused by a lot of force, such as from an auto or bicycle accident, a direct blow to the spine, or compressing the spine by falling onto the buttocks or head. 

    Lower Back Pain and Horse Riders

    The most common injury in horse riders is a disc herniation or a disc prolapse. This comes fromrepetitive loading and vibration. 

    4870095 ruptured diskAlthough this injury is serious and very painful it does not mean the end of your riding career or your dreams, 95% of people suffer the same, and many recover to live normal lives. The disc is the shock-absorbing structure between the vertebrae. It is the cushion that allows us to bounce and jump and run and ride and absorb the impact through our bodies.

    The disc is under pressure from all our activities in life, not just horse riding. Lifting, bending, twisting, coughing, sneezing, sitting, running riding, and many more life activities put the disc under pressure. The disc is damaged from these micro repeated pressures and eventually bulges into the spinal space, this is called a disc herniation.

    This often progresses to a disc prolapse, this is when the disc cracks and the pulpis (center structure) ooze out into the spinal space.

     The level of the prolapse determines the symptoms presenting. The symptoms depend on the position the prolapse occurs, sometimes the nerves are involved and in others, they are not. In my case, it completely squashed the L 5 nerve root and I had complete numbness and muscle weakness of that nerve root.

    I was lucky  I did not get leg pain I only had lower back pain and the tilted posture. The management of disc prolapse is determined by the level of the prolapse and the symptoms presenting. A person with a lot of pain needs to take pain medication prescribed by their doctor. Sometimes it is a matter of trial and error with drugs.

    Treatment on the spine is so useful to treat pain, muscle spasm, and joint movement. Everybody needs advice on posture, daily activities, and how to do what they do. The disc will heal over time and it needs to be protected as it does. The body recognizes the prolapse as a foreign body and the cells will slowly eat the prolapse away and the nerve root will recover to a point and the pain settles.

    Management For a Disc Injury. Lower Back Pain and Horse Riders.

    I prescribe a back bracein nearly all my back pain patients. Absolutely core exercises are started immediately and functional core training is started. Pain medication must be taken as necessary and heat is also very useful. Not everybody improves with heat, some respond to ice, so try both if you are not sure which is correct for you.

    Avoid sitting for long periods and also standing. Lifting, bending twisting, running, coughing, sneezing all increase the disc pressure and increase pain.

    Rest from loading is absolutely necessary. Rest from riding is necessary too. Rest is a word horse ridersdon't like to hear and all ask how long. Well, it is just a fact it takes a split second to be injured and months to heal...a fact of life riders!!! We are all prepared to allow our horses to rest the maximum time required, so do the same for yourself.

    Back Brace jpgAs a physiotherapist, I also treat my back pain patients. I use acupuncture, mobilization, and of course advice on lifting and work and exercises. A back brace or taping are also adjuncts to treatments.

    Some patients need to be referred for a prescription of anti-inflammatory drugs, but many just take over the counter medications.

    Controlling back spasms is primary. Time and knowledge are important. It is important to get your body back to a posture that it can heal in. Regaining muscle length, joint position, and flexibility and not aggravating it is important.

    As far as returning to riding, the core strength and the jarring need to be managed. Lower Back pain stops the core working so overriding the mechanism is important. I teach my patients the core crunch and how to use the back brace to improve their core. I advise you to ride in a back brace and certainly have it on while around the horse yard.

    To finish off, each person is different but the injury is the same. It affects your whole life, not just your riding. It is important to get and follow professional advice. I do allow my patients to ride early because riding is not bad for your back...putting the saddle, on, though, IS.

    If you are returning to riding after an injury and want to follow my program then join my

    Applied Posture Riding Membership Program

    . Good luck and enjoy your riding